Digital Minefield

Why The Machines Are Winning

Auto Autonomous, Part Three


Everyone refers to them as autonomous vehicles. Everyone is wrong. Why? Very simply, they are not autonomous. They are no more autonomous than iRobot’s Roomba vacuum cleaner.

Not everyone has a Roomba, but everyone knows it’s not autonomous. It’s a robot. The company’s website describes it as such, never using the word “autonomous.” What’s the difference?

A robot, says the Merriam-Webster dictionary, works automatically. Another good word might be “automaton,” something that acts as if by its own power. That’s a long way from being truly autonomous.

Actually, in the dictionary, it’s just two definitions away. In between is “automotive.” Then we have “autonomous,” defined as having the power or right to govern itself. Self? What self? These so-called autonomous cars have no more self then a Roomba does.

To emphasize my point, the word “autonomous” comes from the Greek “autonomos”meaning to have its own laws. Whose own? There’s no “who” here, it’s a machine. It’s a “what,” not a “who.”

Unlike that dramatic moment in the original Frankenstein film, no one will cry out, “It’s alive!” when the key is turned. The tissue, the hardware, will remain what it always was—dead.

Obviously, the solution has to be in the software. So, why does AI’s approach to intelligence not follow the only example we have, our own? Why does AI believe in a mythical “pure” intelligence, divorced from body, from emotion, from consciousness, from self?

An individual only becomes human (and intelligent) through the medium of other humans. However, AI prefers intelligence in isolation, as a philosophical ideal. No wonder they keep failing.

One thing for sure, saying these cars are autonomous makes them sound smarter than they really are. Do the promoters want to deceive themselves or us? Either way, they’re not that smart.

Since many really big companies are determined to roll out autonomous cars, I’m sure they will appear in many different forms. Where they’re likely to succeed is as taxicabs in cities.

I can see people using these regularly and still be unwilling to buy one. Unwilling or unable. While it may seem logical to the car makers that cars made by robots should be driven by robots, who’s left with a job to buy the cars?

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